The “Wow!” Signal



ABSTRACT 

In 2016, the Center for Planetary Science proposed a hypothesis arguing a comet and/or its hydrogen cloud were a strong candidate for the source of the “Wow!” Signal. From 27 November 2016 to 24 February 2017, the Center for Planetary Science conducted 200 observations in the radio spectrum to validate the hypothesis. The investigation discovered that comet 266/P Christensen emitted a radio signal at 1420.25 MHz. All radio emissions detected were within 1° (60 arcminutes) of the known celestial coordinates of the comet as it transited the neighborhood of the “Wow!” Signal. During observations of the comet, a series of experiments determined that known celestial sources at 1420 MHz (i.e., pulsars and/or active galactic nuclei) were not within 15° of comet 266/P Christensen. To dismiss the source of the signal as emission from comet 266/P Christensen, the position of the 10-meter radio telescope was moved 1° (60 arcminutes) away from comet 266/P Christensen. During this experiment, the 1420.25 MHz signal disappeared. When the radio telescope was repositioned back to comet 266/P Christensen, a radio signal at 1420.25 MHz reappeared. Furthermore, to determine if comets other than comet 266/P Christensen emit a radio signal at 1420 MHz, we observed three comets that were selected randomly from the JPL Small Bodies database: P/2013 EW90 (Tenagra), P/2016 J1-A (PANSTARRS), and 237P/LINEAR. During observations of these comets, we detected a radio signal at 1420 MHz. The results of this investigation, therefore, conclude that cometary spectra are detectable at 1420 MHz and, more importantly, that the 1977 “Wow!” Signal was a natural phenomenon from a Solar System body.

FULL PAPER:

To be Published Summer 2017


ABOUT THE JOURNAL:

The Journal of the Washington Academy of Sciences is the official organ of the Washington Academy of Sciences. This peer-reviewed Journal publishes original scientific research and includes the scientific work of ten Nobel Prize winners.

 


CONTACT INFORMATION:

DIRECTOR@PLANETARY-SCIENCE.ORG


RESPONSE:

15 June 2017:

The Center for Planetary Science is fully aware of some criticism, specifically from SETI and legacy Big Ear Radio Telescope staff, regarding the “Wow!” Paper. The Center for Planetary Science, however, stands by its findings and will not be pressured to pull the paper from print. The purpose of science, including our paper, is to spark more questions – which in turns leads to more science. We disagree with SETI and legacy Big Ear staff.